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Are you thinking about selling your Chicago business?

It may not seem like the best time to sell a business right now due to the pandemic, but there is more to think about than the overall economy. As we’ve seen from the Financial Crisis of 2007-08 and now the COVID-19 recession, we can’t control what will happen from one day to the next. While you certainly want to consider the economic climate, there are other factors to pay attention to as well.

American Business Acquisitions (ABA) is a premier Chicago business broker that works with people who want to buy or sell businesses. After working with many clients over the years, we’ve come to find that these five signs are most telling as to when to sell your company.

1. You feel like you’ve peaked.

Does it seem like you’ve reached the top of the mountain? There may be growth within your industry, but if you don’t have the time, resources or energy to go after them, it may be time to consider or implement an exit strategy and take advantage of being at the top of your game, which is the best time to sell a business.

You can sell your Chicagoland business to a larger company or a group of individual buyers who have the resources to take on these new growth opportunities. You’ll feel good knowing that your business can continue growing and build on the momentum established during your ownership.

2. Your Chicago business has increased in value.

If you were cautious about your spending and operations, there’s a good chance that your business has increased in value. If this is the case, there’s probably other entrepreneurs who would be interested in buying it from you. This is especially true if your company fills a particular niche. A business acquisition or merger would allow a larger company to expand their products and services to this new clientele. Why not cash in on your hard work?

3. You’re getting ready to retire.

As you move into retirement, there are many practical benefits to selling your company. You can earn a significant nest egg from the sale that will allow you to achieve a comfortable retirement. Sure, you can live off the income from the business, but you’ll still have a lot of responsibility. For most business owners, it’s best to sell their business when they want to sell rather than when they have to sell so they can begin planning for the next chapter in life at an opportune time.

4. Your net worth is tied up in your Chicago business.

If you’re like many business owners, a large portion of your net worth is tied up in your business. At one point, this may have been okay, but now you may be looking to convert this equity into liquid assets. This can be an especially smart move if you’re nearing retirement and want to convert your business wealth into personal wealth.

5. You’ve lost your passion.

Some business owners experience a roller coaster of emotions when it comes to selling their business. We can understand this, as your business was probably your “baby” at one point. But if you’ve lost your passion, are ready for change or simply don’t enjoy taking care of operations any longer, it’s okay to happily pass the torch. You can use your nest egg to pursue other ventures – even if it’s sitting on the beach all winter.

It’s normal to feel conflicted about selling your business. Speaking with a business broker in Chicago can help you sort through your options and make the best decision based on short term plans and future goals. Contact American Business Acquisitions today for a free consultation.

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Ownership Transition Survey Results on feedback and answers from family-owned businesses

Mass Mutual Life Insurance produced an ownership transition survey back about a decade ago.  The survey results were based on feedback and answers from family-owned businesses.  It produced some very interesting results, and is worth examining even today.  While the survey at this point is quite outdated in terms of the timeline, there are still many valuable nuggets of information to be gleaned from it.  Let’s dive in and take a closer look at the numbers and what they can tell us for 2021 and beyond.

While the Mass Mutual Life Insurance ownership transition survey had a range of important points, the one that leaps right off the page is the fact that a whopping 80% of family-owned businesses are still being controlled by their founders.  A large percentage of those founders are Baby Boomers who will have little choice but to retire in the next few years.

The survey indicated that 55% of CEOs over the age of 61 or older have yet to choose a successor.  This fact serves to emphasize the fact that a “retirement wave” will hit family-owned businesses, and this will lead to some interesting shifts and opportunities.  And while the survey indicated that 13% of CEOs state they will never retire, the reality of the situation is that ownership will eventually change hands.  Business brokers can expect to see an unprecedented wave of interest in their services.  Additionally, prospective buyers will also have a highly unique opportunity to buy established businesses.

The survey also indicated that 30% of family-owned businesses will be changing leadership within the next five years.  Of course, with that change of leadership, many possibilities open up, including the possibility of selling.  However, it is important to note that while there will be a “retirement wave” amongst the Baby Boomers, not all businesses currently owned by Baby Boomers will be placed on the market.

The survey noted that 90% of businesses currently plan on remaining family-owned, and 85% of businesses plan on having their next CEO be a family member.  However, it is important to keep in mind that even if these numbers were to hold true, that means at least 10% of businesses will be up for sale.

It is likely that this number is far higher now than when the survey was conducted due to the aging nature of the Baby Boomer population and owners looking to sell because of pandemic related issues.  Simply stated, there will be no shortage of businesses for sale in 2021 and beyond.

Another important aspect of the survey to consider is the fact that family-owned businesses are not prepared to sell.  According to the survey, 20% of family-owned businesses have not completed any form of estate planning, and 55% of family owners do not have any formal company valuation for estate tax estimates.  Combine these statistics with the fact that 60% of businesses do have a written strategic plan, and it becomes clear that family-owned businesses, especially those considering selling in the future, are most definitely in need of professional assistance.  Many family-owned businesses are ill prepared for the future and have a range of vulnerabilities.  Business brokers and M&A advisors are uniquely positioned to provide those services.

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The Importance of Owner Flexibility

You shouldn’t expect to sell your company overnight.  For every company that sells quickly, there are a hundred that take many months or even years to sell.  Having the correct mindset and understanding of what you must do ahead of time to prepare for the sale of your company will help you avoid a range of headaches and dramatically increase your overall chances of success.

First, and arguably most importantly, you must have the right frame of mind.  Flexibility is a key attribute for any business owner looking to sell his or her business.  There are many variables involved in selling a business, and that means much can go wrong.  An inflexible owner can even irritate prospective buyers and inadvertently sabotage what could have otherwise been a workable deal.

Be Flexible on Price

A key part of being flexible is to be ready and willing to accept a lower price.  There are many reasons why business owners may fail to achieve the price they want for their business.  These factors range from lack of management depth and lack of geographical distribution to an overreliance on a handful of customers or key clients.  Of course, one way to address this problem is to work with a business broker or M&A advisor in advance, so that such price issues are minimized or eliminated altogether.

Be Prepared to Compromise

In the process of selling your business, you may want to achieve confidentiality and sell your business quickly and for the price you want.  However, the fact is that most sellers find that it is possible to have confidentiality, speed, and the price you want, but not all three.  Ultimately, you’ll have to pick two of the three variables that are most important to you.

Be Patient

A third way in which business owner flexibility can boost the chances of success is to embrace the virtue of patience.  By accepting the fact that businesses can “sit on the shelf” for a considerable period of time, you are shifting your expectations.  This realization can help reduce your stress level.  The fact is that stressed out owners are far more likely to make mistakes.

Sometimes Losing is Really Winning

A fourth way in which business owners should be flexible is realizing that you and your lawyer will not win every single fight.  There will be many points of contention, and a smart dealmaker realizes that it is often better to have a good deal than a perfect deal.  You may have to make sacrifices in order to sell your company.  Simply stated, you shouldn’t expect the other side to lose every point.

At the end of the day, a savvy business owner is one that never loses sight of the final goal.  Your goal is to sell your business.  Seeing the situation from the buyer’s perspective will help you make better decisions on how you present your business and interact with prospective buyers.  Maintaining a flexible attitude with prospective buyers helps to position you as a reasonable person who wants to make a deal.  Goodwill can go a long way when obstacles do arise.

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Getting the Most Out of Confidentiality Agreements

When it comes to buying or selling a business, there is no replacement for a solid confidentiality agreement.  One of the key ways that business brokers and M&A advisors are able to help buyers and sellers alike is through their extensive knowledge of confidentiality agreements and how best to implement them.  In this article, we will provide you with an overview of what you should expect out of your confidentiality agreements.

A confidentiality agreement is a legal agreement that essentially forbids both buyers and sellers, as well as related parties such as agents, from disclosing information regarding the transition.  It is a best practice to have a confidentiality agreement in place before discussing the business in any way and especially before divulging key information on the operation of the business or trade secrets. 

While a confidentiality agreement can be used to keep the fact that a business is for sale private, that is only a small aspect of what modern confidentiality agreements generally seek to accomplish.  Confidentiality agreements are used to ensure that a prospective buyer doesn’t use any proprietary data, knowledge or trade secrets to benefit themselves or other parties.

When creating a confidentiality agreement, it is important to keep several variables in mind, such as what information will be excluded and what information will be disclosed, the term of the confidentiality agreement, the remedy for breach, and the manner in which confidential information will be used and handled. 

Any effective confidentiality agreement will contain a variety of key points.  Sellers will want their confidentiality agreement to cover a fairly wide array of territory.  For example, the confidentiality agreement will state that the potential buyer will not attempt to hire away employees.  In general, this and many other details, will have a termination date.

The specifics of how confidentiality is to be maintained should also be included in the confidentiality agreement.  Parties should agree to hold conversations in private; this point has become increasingly important due to the use of mobile phones and in particular the use of mobile phones in out-of-office locations.  Additionally, it is prudent to specify that principal names should not be used in outside discussions and that a code name should be developed for the name of the proposed merger or acquisition. 

Safeguarding documents is another area that should receive considerable attention.  Digital files should be password protected.  All paperwork should be kept in a safe location and locked away for maximum privacy when not in use.

In their enthusiasm to find a buyer for their business, many sellers have overlooked the confidentiality agreement stage of the process.  Most have regretted doing so.  A confidentiality agreement can help protect your business’s key information from being exploited during the sales process.  Any experienced and capable business broker or M&A advisor will strongly recommend that buyers and sellers always depend on confidentiality agreements to establish information disclosure perimeters.

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How to Optimize Your Chances of Selling Your Business

The simple fact is that selling your business is likely to be the single most important financial decision you’ll ever make.  With this important fact in mind, it is essential that you prepare far in advance.  Let’s dive in and take a look at some of the key items you’ll want to check off your list before placing your business on the market.

Think About Legalities

When it comes to selling a business, legal issues should be at the forefront of your thoughts; after all, selling your business does involve the creation and execution of a complex and detailed legal agreement.  There are many times in life where it is possible to cut corners, but hiring a good lawyer or law firm is not one of those times.  Moreover, you’ll want to settle all litigation, environmental issues or other issues that could potentially derail a sale.

Deal with Serious Buyers

Working with a good business broker or M&A advisor is an essential part of the selling process, as these professionals will help you to weed out “window shoppers” as well as prospective buyers who are simply not a good fit for your business.  Any serious buyer should be willing to submit a Letter of Intent.  Everyone should be on the same page as far as price and terms as well as what assets and liabilities are to be assumed.  This second point reinforces the first point.  It is essential to have an experienced lawyer helping you through various aspects of the sales process.

Be Flexible on Price

You should also be prepared to accept a lower price than you might ideally want.  There are many reasons that this may occur, ranging from a lack of management depth and a lack of geographical distribution to a dependence on a limited number of clients.  Reliance on a small number of customers and/or clients can give potential buyers pause, as it could raise concerns regarding the stability of your business.  Addressing these issues years before placing your business on the market can help you best achieve the price point you desire.  This is yet another reason to work with a business broker in advance.

Improving Your Chances for Success

In terms of achieving the price that you want for your business, there are other steps you can take.  Increasing the visibility and profile of your business is always a savvy move.  Consider attending trade shows, boost your online profile via stepping up your social media game and explore creating a coherent public relations program.

Finally, selling a business is often a waiting game.  You have to be psychologically prepared to wait a considerable period of time before your business is sold.  The fact is that most businesses do indeed sit on the shelf for a considerable period of time before they are sold.

Preparation, patience and good organization will dramatically increase your chances of selling your business and achieving an appropriate price.  The sooner you begin organizing your business and working with experienced professionals, the greater the chances of success will be.

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Insights from BizBuySell’s 3rd Quarter Insight Report

Most business buyers and sellers are wondering what 2021 and beyond will bring.  BizBuySell and BizQuest President Bob House provided a range of insights stemming from BizBuySell’s 3rd Quarter Insight Report and a survey of over 2,300 business owners. 

The simple fact is that the pandemic has most definitely had a major impact on the buying and selling of businesses.  This fact is obvious.  But diving deeper, there are a range of insights that can be gleaned. 

First, owners do understand that COVID is a massive force in business right now.  According to the survey, 68% of owners feel that they would have received a better price for their business in 2019 than in 2020.  Only 37% of respondents felt that they would receive a better price this year.  Of owners who felt that they would receive a lower price in 2020 than in 2019, 71% of these owners said that their assessment was directly tied to the pandemic and its accompanying economic impact.

A question on the survey asked owners if the pandemic had impacted their exit plans.  55% responded that the pandemic had not changed their exit plans.  Additionally, 22% said that they now planned on exiting later, and 12% stated that they planned on exiting earlier.  In short, the majority of business owners were not changing their exit plans.

On the other side of the coin, buyers are acknowledging that the present seems to be a very good time to buy.  A staggering 81% of buyers stated that they felt confident that they would be able to find an acceptable price point.  In terms of their purchasing timeline, 72% of respondents stated that they were planning on buying a business soon.  Survey follow-ups indicated that large numbers of buyers were also planning on buying in 2021.

Generational differences are playing a role as well.  Baby Boomers tend to be more optimistic than non-boomers as far as their overall views on the recovery.  43% of Baby Boomers now expect the economy to recover within the next year as compared to just 30% of non-Boomers.  House pointed out, “Baby Boomers are the generation that did not plan, which makes it harder for them to adjust transition plans if they were preparing to retire, as small businesses don’t have the infrastructure and management teams in place to wait out a bad cycle.”

Based on the information collected by BizBuySell’s 3rd Quarter Insight Report and their survey, it is clear that there is a new wave of buyers on the horizon.  The report supports the notion that the pandemic has made small business ownership an attractive option for new entrepreneurs.  Factors driving new entrepreneurs into the marketplace include everything from being unemployed and wanting more control over their own futures to a desire to capitalize on opportunities. 

Finally, House notes that 2021 could be a “perfect storm for business sales,” as 10,000 Americans will turn 65 each and every day.  This means that the supply of excellent businesses entering the marketplace will likely increase dramatically.

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Zeroing in on Goodwill

Goodwill is a term that might cause a little confusion for some.  But at its heart, it is a relatively straight-forward concept.  Goodwill is generally viewed as a term that encapsulates everything from a business’s reputation to the goods, services and products it provides.  The key idea is that there is goodwill if the business is viewed as a true and functioning business that has longevity in the marketplace. 

The Importance of Reputation

It is important to point out that many of the aspects that go into defining goodwill are not easily noted on a balance sheet.  One of those elements has already been mentioned in the form of reputation.  A good reputation is an intangible asset that is hard to put an exact dollar amount on.  Imagine that you had a choice between two businesses that were almost identical.  However, one business enjoyed a strong reputation while the other had a reputation for poor customer service and goods and services.  This decision would be an easy one for most prospective buyers.

Going Beyond the Numbers

When a buyer pays more than the recognized value of a business, goodwill usually plays a major role.  There are many variables that can be included into goodwill such as quality and track record of management; strength of the local economy; the loyalty of the customer base; good relationships with suppliers; copyrights; trademarks and patents; name or brand recognition; specialized training and knowhow.  The list goes on.  Business brokers and M&A advisors will be sure to highlight these goodwill factors to prospective buyers.  Factors that impact the longevity of a business, and its long-term potential, should not be overlooked.

The Evolving Meaning of Goodwill

In recent years, the accounting profession has changed how it deals with the concept of goodwill and how it is factored into decisions.  Since the rise of the Industrial Revolution, many large companies were built around the ownership and use of heavy equipment and machinery; however, in the last two decades there has been a shift away from tangible assets and towards intangible assets. 

Assets under the umbrella of intellectual property, including patents, trademarks, brand names and more, are now considered key aspects of goodwill.  In short, in the last twenty-years, goodwill has taken on a more complex and varied meaning.  Today, businesses are not necessarily based around massive factors and huge assembly lines.  Workers and management in the world’s largest companies 50 years ago would be hard pressed to explain the inner workings of some of today’s corporate juggernauts.

Goodwill is more complicated than ever before.  This factor serves to underscore the value, and importance, of working with an experienced, capable and proven business broker or M&A advisors.  The goodwill elements within a business need to be highlighted so that prospective buyers fully understand the business’ real value. 

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What Makes a Deal Close?

For every reason that a pending sale of a business collapses, there is a positive reason why the sale closed successfully.  What does it take for the sale of a business to close successfully?  Certainly there are reasons that a sale might not close that are beyond anyone’s control.  A fire, for example, the death of a principal, or a natural disaster such as a hurricane or tornado.  There might be an environmental problem that the seller was unaware of when he or she decided to sell.  Aside from these unplanned catastrophic events, deals abort because of the people involved.  Here are a few examples of how a sale closes successfully.

The Buyer and Seller Are in Agreement From the Beginning

In too many cases, the buyer and seller really weren’t in agreement, or didn’t understand the terms of the sale.  If an offer to purchase is too vague, or has too many loose ends, the sale can unravel somewhere along the line.  However, if prior to the offer to purchase the loose ends are taken care of and the agreement specifically spells out the details of the sale, it has a much better chance to close.  This means that a lot of answers and information are supplied prior to the offer and that many of the buyer’s questions are answered before the offer is made.  The seller may also have some questions about the buyer’s financial qualifications or his or her ability to operate the business.  Again, these concerns should be addressed prior to the offer or, at least, if they are part of it, both sides should understand exactly what needs to be done and when.  The key ingredient of the offer to purchase is that both sides completely understand the terms and are comfortable with them.  Too many sales fall apart because of a misunderstanding on one side or the other.

The Buyer and Seller Don’t Lose Their Patience

Both sides need to understand that the closing process takes time.  There is a myriad of details that must take place for the sale to close successfully, or to close at all.  If the parties are using outside advisors, they should make sure that they are deal-oriented.  In other words, unless the deal is illegal or unethical, the parties should insist that the deal works.  The buyer and seller should understand that the outside advisors work for them and that most decisions concerning the sale are business related and should be decided by the buyer and seller themselves.  The buyer and seller should also insist that the outside advisors keep to the scheduled closing date, unless they, not the outside advisors, delay the timing.  Prior to engaging the outside advisors, the buyer and seller should make sure that their advisors can work within the schedule.  However, the buyer and seller have to also understand that nothing can be done overnight and the closing process does take some time.

No One Likes Surprises

The seller has to be up front about his or her business.  Nothing is perfect and buyers understand this.  The minuses should be revealed at the outset because sooner or later they will be exposed.  For example, the seller should consult with his or her accountant about any tax implications prior to going to market.  The same is true for the buyer.  If financing is an issue it should be mentioned at the beginning.  If all of the concerns and problems are dealt with initially, the closing will be just a technicality.

The Buyer and Seller Must Both Feel Like They Got a Good Deal

If they do, the closing should be a simple matter.  If the chemistry works, and everyone understands and accepts the terms of the agreement, and feels that the sale is a win-win, the closing is a mere formality.

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Turn to the Professionals for Best Results

There is a direct relationship between the asking price and the amount of cash on the table at the time of the sale.  Buyers and sellers alike should keep one fact in mind.  Most businesses involve some level of seller financing.  It is customary for both buyers and sellers to have concerns regarding this kind of financing; after all, sellers don’t want to take their businesses back from the buyer.  Buyers want to generate enough money to help the business thrive and make a living.  One proven way to ensure the successful sale of a business is to turn to the experts.

Screen out Window Shoppers

The simple and very established fact is that when you choose to work with the professionals, it can streamline the entire sales process.  Business owners are typically very busy people.  That means they don’t have time to waste with window shoppers.  They also don’t want to divulge confidential information to parties that don’t possess the means to actually follow through with a successful sale. 

Business brokers and M&A advisors know that most prospective buyers are just dreamers or will ultimately fail to qualify.  When you work with the professionals, it means that you have a shield to protect you and your valuable time.  Experienced brokers have a range of techniques that screen out unqualified candidates and match you with buyers who are the best fit. 

Maintain Confidentiality 

Anyone who has ever sold a business, or even contemplated selling a business, knows all too well that confidentiality is of the utmost importance.  Sellers need to know that the information they reveal will not spill out all over the web.  Brokers are experts maintaining confidentiality and impressing upon prospective buyers the tremendous importance of honoring the agreements they sign. 

It is important to note that leaks regarding the sale of a business can cause a range of often unexpected problems.  Key employees may get nervous about their future prospects and begin looking for a new job, competitors may begin attempting to poach employees, or customers and key suppliers may get nervous and turn to your competitors.  In short, serious buyers and sellers alike benefit from maintaining confidentiality.

Matching the right seller with the right buyer is truly an art and a science. Many factors are involved ranging from financing to psychology. When the right match is made, then it is possible to move through the process of seller financing more quickly and with fewer roadblocks or complications.  Working with a business broker or M&A advisor is the single most important step that any buyer or seller can make to help ensure that seller financing, and in fact the entire sales process, progresses as smoothly as possible.

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Successfully Navigating Seller Financing

Only a small percentage of the population is able to go through life without using some form of financing at some point.  Most people have little choice but to finance everything from their home and car purchases to their college education.  Now, with that stated, most business owners would love to receive an all-cash offer for their business.  But the reality of the situation is quite different.  The facts are that owner financing is very common, and it is sometimes the only way to put a deal together.

Sellers have to be ready and willing to entertain the idea that they may, ultimately, be called upon to handle some aspect of financing if they want to sell their business.  It surprises many to learn that if a seller is not willing to finance the sale, then buyers begin to worry and may even see this as something of a “red flag.”  The reason for this is that many buyers feel that if a business is a solid investment, then the business will be profitable and repaying the seller should be no problem. 

Buyers may worry that if a seller isn’t willing to help with financing there could be a “hidden” problem with the business.  It might occur to them that sellers are “jumping from a sinking ship.”  It is important that sellers keep this important aspect of buyer psychology in mind when addressing whether or not they are willing to finance.

Buyer psychology plays a major role in another aspect of seller financing and that comes in the form of collateral.  Sellers may want to have some form of outside collateral to secure the loan on their business.  While this may seem perfectly understandable to the seller, buyers can have something of a nervous response to this issue as well.  As much as buyers worry that a seller’s refusal to provide financing is a red flag, the same holds true for sellers who seek collateral.  Once again, the concern is that if the business was healthy and thriving there should be no need for collateral.  The buyer is left wondering, “What is going on here?  How worried should I be?  Why do they need collateral if this business is so great?” 

Typically, buyers are “maxed out” when buying a main street business.  They are allocating most of their available funds to the down payment on the business.  That means they will be unlikely to “push all their chips in” and gamble everything by also putting up the home, retirement funds or other collateral in the process.  Sellers need to see the situation from the buyer’s perspective and remember that a collateral requirement could mean that if the business fails, the buyer could be left with nothing.

Navigating the complex interaction between buyers and sellers is no easy feat.  It requires a careful balancing of several different skills, ranging from understanding finance to psychology.  Working with an experienced business broker can help buyers and sellers connect and find workable agreements so deals can get made.

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